Mental Health: Common Symptoms That Work Together

Photo by Daniel Reche on Pexels.com

Mental health is a very important part of overall health and wellness. It is not something that you can see or feel, but it is a very real condition that affects every individual in their own way. Mental illnesses are highly treatable with therapy, medication or both. However, there are some warning signs that indicate you should seek help immediately if you notice them in yourself or others:

Self-destructive behavior

You might be tempted to think that self-destructive behavior is a symptom of a mental health problem. But it’s actually the opposite: self-destructive behavior is a trigger for other concerns.

It’s true that in some cases, people with mental health issues are more likely to engage in self-destructive behavior like substance abuse or risky sex because they’re trying to cope with the symptoms of their disorder. But in many other cases, self-destructive behaviors can cause or exacerbate mental health issues.

Drug use can lead to addiction and make it harder for you to focus on your work or other activities. Sexual promiscuity can lead to STDs and unwanted pregnancies. These things can also drain your finances, making it harder for you to pay bills and buy food—which could cause stress and anxiety, which could lead to depression.

Self-destructive behaviors are not caused by mental health problems—they are triggered by them. When you’re feeling stressed out or anxious or depressed, it’s important not only to get help from professionals who specialize in treating those issues but also to take steps that reduce your stress levels and increase your happiness levels!

Avoiding friends and family

Avoiding friends and family is a sign of depression, PTSD and bipolar disorder.

If you are avoiding friends and family, this could be your first clue that you have a mental health issue such as depression or PTSD. It may also be the result of dealing with an ongoing crisis, such as being in an abusive relationship or caring for someone who has cancer. You don’t have to feel guilty about it—it’s normal to withdraw from people when we are struggling with our own problems.

Trouble concentrating

Difficulty concentrating is a common symptom of many mental health issues, including anxiety and depression. It can be difficult for you to focus on your schoolwork or work responsibilities, or it may be difficult for you to attend to conversations with family members or friends. You might also have trouble paying attention during conversations with others.

How can I get help?

If you are suffering from difficulty concentrating, there are many ways that you can find support and treatment. You should start by talking with a trusted adult, who can help guide you through the process of getting treatment. If this is not an option, consider calling one of the hotlines listed at the end of this document; they offer free services that will connect people in need of help with counselors who can provide information about available resources in their area

Sudden weight loss or gain

  • Sudden weight loss or gain can be a sign of an eating disorder. If you’ve lost a lot of weight suddenly, it could be that you’re suffering from an eating disorder. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia are both serious mental illnesses that negatively affect your body image and food intake. They can also lead to other health problems if left untreated for long periods of time, so if this is happening to you, see a professional immediately!
  • Gaining too much weight might be a sign of depression or another medical condition. While gaining weight does not necessarily mean that someone is depressed or has another mental illness—sometimes people just gain more muscle mass than usual—it could still indicate something serious going on in their life that needs attention right away! If this happens often enough over time without any explanation, then there may indeed be some underlying issue causing this behavior pattern to manifest itself outwardly on such regular basis; it might be worth checking into further before deciding whether or not treatment is necessary at all

Withdrawing from activities they once enjoyed

Mental health is about more than just being well. It’s about being well and feeling content with yourself, your life, and the way you’re living it. The best way to achieve this is by staying active in hobbies or activities that make you happy.

For example: if you used to enjoy playing video games but find yourself losing interest in them lately (or have stopped playing altogether), then maybe it’s time for a change of pace! What else do you enjoy? Do some research online or ask around until something catches your eye—you may be surprised by what comes up! Once you’ve found something that interests you enough to make an effort at pursuing it, try setting aside time each day—even if only for 20 minutes at first—to devote yourself fully while doing so. This will help ensure success with sticking with it long term as well as provide incentive to keep making time for those things important enough not only for mental health but also overall wellbeing in general.”

Loss of energy or fatigue

This one is a no-brainer. If you’re feeling tired, it’s probably because you’ve been up all night worrying about something. Anxiety and depression can both cause this, as well as many other issues like stress and fear.

If you’re constantly experiencing feelings of exhaustion and have trouble getting out of bed in the morning, it could be an indicator that something else is going on with your mental health.

Feeling restless, fidgety, or irritable

If you are feeling restless, fidgety, or irritable, this may be a sign that you have depression. It is common for people who are depressed to feel restless and irritated. These feelings can make it hard for them to sit still or concentrate on anything for long periods of time. In some cases, these feelings may be a symptom of bipolar disorder (which causes extreme mood swings). Restlessness and irritability are also signs of PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), a mental illness that occurs after someone experiences trauma such as war or abuse.

If you notice any of these symptoms in yourself or others, get help right away.

If you notice any of the following symptoms in yourself or in others, get help right away:

  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Flashbacks, nightmares and other repetitive thoughts or memories
  • Substance abuse/alcoholism. If you’re drinking more than usual, taking drugs or medications to cope with your feelings, experiencing withdrawal symptoms from substance abuse/alcoholism (e.g., seizures), or feeling particularly “high” after using substances like marijuana for a long time without stopping—these are all signs that you might need help coping with addiction issues. In addition to counseling and therapy sessions with an addiction therapist who specializes in PTSD treatment methods, many veterans also find that peer support groups are helpful for overcoming their addictions so they can focus on healing properly instead of just managing their symptoms.

If you notice any of these symptoms in yourself or others, get help right away. Mental health is too important to ignore and should be treated as soon as possible. There are many ways to deal with these issues from therapy to medication but always remember that your mental health is worth it!

Until our beautiful minds meet again. Be safe out there. Many blessings snd much love. Remember Everyday Minds Matter – Della 💞 🦋

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