Forget Me Not –Dementia💖

Forget Me Not

Do you feel like there are times in your life where you can’t remember where you put your keys? It’s okay. We all have those times. Today, this post will help you understand Dementia. Digging further into Dementia to acknowledge crucial symptoms that’s more than forgetfulness.

If you are experiencing forgetfulness, finding that your brain is always in a fog, unable to focus on things with clarity, and you feel like the world is moving too fast for you; you may be suffering from dementia.

Forgetfulness is a normal part of ageing. However, when it becomes more severe, is persistent and interferes with day-to-day life, it can be an early sign of dementia.

Memory loss and confusion are some of the most common symptoms of dementia, however there are other changes in thinking, behaviour, movement and mood that are noticeable too.

Dementia is a loss of memory and other mental abilities severe enough to interfere with daily life. It is a growing global health crisis that if left unchecked will reach epidemic proportions by 2050. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, Alzheimer’s disease accounts for 60-80% of cases of dementia, but there are many other forms, including vascular dementia, which is caused by an interruption in blood supply to the brain.

In Time Strong emotional memories of past people may resurface as delusions and hallucinations in dementia. People with dementia may find it difficult to separate past experiences from current reality and may relive these events to some extent. Delusions in dementia can be paranoid; for example, people with dementia may believe that someone is stealing from them. They may believe their spouse is cheating on them, or someone wants to catch them. Hallucinations in dementia can be pleasant; for example, a person can see and talk to “little people”, animals, or a person from their past (such as a deceased parent). Studies of people with exceptional autobiographical memories or altered memories seem to support this. Older people with depression may have more memory lapses that can be confused with symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease or other types of dementia. Memory loss due to dementia is one of the most serious problems of the elderly, although it is not a direct consequence of aging. Vascular dementia also causes progressive loss of memory and other cognitive functions, including organization, attention, and problem solving. Although strokes may be unnoticeably small, the damage can accumulate over time, leading to memory loss, confusion, and other signs of dementia.

Personality and mood changes are usually the first symptoms, followed by speech problems and memory loss. In the mild phase, the patient has significant memory lapses such as loss of familiar places, disconnection from activities and conversations, may have trouble recognizing the date, and exhibit symptoms of depression and hostility.

Patients with mild cognitive impairment have actual memory loss rather than the sometimes slow recovery of memory from the relatively intact memory of the same age control group. Given enough time to think and answer questions, patients with age-related memory impairment can usually do so, indicating that memory and cognitive function are intact. Treatment with therapy can help recall lost memories and information, but it can take a long time and patient perseverance.

The memory changes slightly each time we remember it, and comes back stronger and brighter with each memory. It has long been thought that memory is more stable with age, but this is not always the case. Over time, people’s learning ability and memory quality decline without any lesions.

In fact, you keep reliving those awkward memories and you may feel like you can’t turn off your brain. The main symptom of long-term memory loss is forgetting something that happened earlier in your life that might have had some meaning or meaning to you, such as the name of your high school or where you lived. Patients with delirium have memory impairment, but the underlying cause is usually severe and fluctuating global changes in mental status (primarily in attention) and cognitive dysfunction rather than memory loss.

Memory loss or forgetfulness is scary once progressed. Loved one’s can become afraid once dementia is present. Not knowing past or current events, people, or places can change one’s understanding of who they are. Later to confuse time with blurred memory is life changing. Your not alone, resources are available for all parties involved.

It’s important to make note of new changes and address the accordingly. . Caregivers should communicate noticable changes to reassure safety and health concerns are provided. These illnesses can be challenging for all involved. Take care of yourself and each other.

Until our minds meet again. Be safe out there, blessings and much love. Remember Everyday Mind’s Matter 🎭💗

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